In celebration of Mother’s day, we spoke to the women who inspire us.

We interviewed 2 pairs of Mothers and their Daughters within our Women Of Silou community at their homes and the House of SILOU, to share important lessons we have learnt from our mothers and why we are thankful to them.

Meet Tabitha Willett and Muffin Hurst

How do you think your Mother’s advice has shaped you to the person you are today?

Mummy has always had this incredible strength about her and I struggle to think of any time that I have seen her vulnerable. She is doting and loving and a self-proclaimed feeder but I think it is her strength and tough-love approach to life that has made me the strong woman that I am today.

– Tabitha

I am one of six children and so it was always full and busy at home.  My mother had a practical, no-nonsense approach (understandably!), so we didn’t really get away with any whingeing or complaining.  I’d say this has probably made me quite a positive person. She was also very good with home cooking and natural remedies which is definitely something I’m pleased she taught me.

– Muffin

How similar and different are you to your Mum/ Daughter?

We are very similar – maybe a little too similar. As a teenager, we fought like cats and dogs as we are both very strong-willed women! But as two adults and two mothers, we work as best friends. There is rarely a day in the week that I’m not asking for her advice on something.

– Tabitha

Tabitha is one of three daughters and they are all incredibly different from one another, which is great.  Tabitha is strong-willed, but I’m impressed with how she sticks to her guns in quite a soft way. We are both strong women, but where I could be accused of being quite a force, Tabby’s much more gentle with it.  Of course, being quite similar, we had our moments when she was a teenager!

– Muffin

Which habits have you picked up from your mum?

We are both talkers and love interacting with other people. Before doing what I do now I was always in a client-facing job and I so loved meeting new people. I pride myself and my mother that we could probably be sat anywhere at a wedding or dinner party and have the ability to leave with a new friend.

– Tabitha

What habits do most mothers of my generation pick up from their children?  Social media! And I’m always asking for Tabitha’s fashion and style advice.

– Muffin

What lessons have you learnt from being a mother and still trying to learn?

My patience is probably something that I could work on. I try to count to 10 and breathe but when a toddler is yanking on your hair and throwing their head around at bedtime this isn’t the easiest! I luckily have a very strong partner in my fiance that helps a lot.

– Tabitha

I have loved being a mother, and now a grandmother; nothing makes me more proud or happy.  I think the gift of giving your children wings to fly is the best we can do, but it is very bittersweet when they use them and leave the nest.  I am still trying to learn the right balance of being involved in their lives, but not interfering. It is a constantly evolving role.

– Muffin

What has Motherhood taught you?

Quite simply l-o-v-e. I was told when I was pregnant the intense intense love that you feel and I sort of thought – well, obviously – and brushed it aside. But my goodness it is just pure euphoric love that I have never experienced before. Total heaven.

– Tabitha

That I am strong.  I would do ANYTHING for my children.  Being a mother is a huge responsibility, but so worth it.

– Muffin

What were you doing at Tabitha’s age?

Oh my goodness – I married and had my children so young.  At Tabitha’s age now, I was about to have my third child and we were still living in London.  I didn’t have much of social life as the family was all-consuming, plus I continued to work part-time running my children’s theatre group.  Perhaps it was quite intense, but possibly explains why my 30’s looked more like Tabitha’s ’20s!

– Muffin

What advice do you have for someone when thinking about what to get their Mum for mother’s day?

Small gestures have a big impact. A cup of tea in bed in the morning. A lie-in while your other half looks after your baby. Driving that little bit out of the way to spend the day with your mother. All of these mean so much to a Mummy and probably more than a piece of jewellery.

– Tabitha

If you have grown-up children, the gift of time is the best.  Sharing some time with those children who have flown the nest is as good as it gets, whether it’s lunch, an exhibition, an exercise class, a walk.  And for those little children, it’s the home touches I love: a drawing, an effort to make breakfast in bed… so sweet.

– Muffin

In your opinion, how different is the world you grew up in compared to your daughter?

It’s much faster.  Everyone is always in a rush, but for what?  I think there is more pressure on the young now, but less accountability.  In my day, looking after yourself was sometimes looked upon as selfish, but I like the way the young are now aware that health and self-love are positive and from that, you are better able to care for others.

– Muffin

 How did you find your personal shopping experience at the House Of SILOU?

Silou is in the most lovely location, so from the very start, you feel there is a treat in store.  The Studio is calm, private and comfortable. The clothing is excellent quality with so many fabulous combinations to try on.  It was great to have space for the two of us so we could check out each other’s outfits and be inspired – personal shopping is a real treat and a really excellent mother/ daughter outing.

– Muffin